Wednesday, February 8, 2017

1925 New York State Census ~ Morris Goldstein

Genealogists are familiar with the United State Federal Census, which has been taken every ten years since 1790. The most recent federal census in which we can find our ancestors is the 1940 U.S. Census.

Many states also took censuses in between the federal censuses, and New York is one state where we can find state census records for several years in between federal censuses.

Here is the New York State census record for my husband's grandparents and uncle in 1925. It is the first census record where I find Morris Goldstein. (No luck in the 1915 New York State Census or in the 1920 U.S. Federal Census.)

 New York State Census, 1925, digital images. Ancestry.com.
New York, New York, A.D. 2, E.D. 24. Page 63, line 33, Record for Morris Goldstein.

This census reports that Morris Goldstein is 27 years old, born in Russia, and has been in the United States for 12 years. (Actually he was born in Romania, and immigrated in 1914.) He is listed as an alien (non-citizen), though he supposedly became a citizen after serving in WWI. (Click here to see his C-File.) His occupation is a tailor of pants.
Wife is 23-year-old Rosa (should be Rose) Goldstein, born in the U.S. with occupation House Wife. However, I believe she did tailoring work of some sort for much of her young life.
And here is 1-year-old Uncle Stanley.
(Their daughter, my mother-in-law, was born a couple of years later.)

Some interesting observations:
There are eleven men named Morris Goldstein with wife Rose or Rosa living in New York City or Brooklyn in 1925.
There are 48 people living at number 7 Second Avenue. The birthplaces are U.S., Russia, Italy, and Poland.

We visited New York City last August and found that 7 Second Avenue is still standing.


Forty eight people lived in this five story building at the corner of Second and Houston in 1925. We visited the Tenement Museum when we visited New York and got a taste of how the Goldsteins lived.

It is also a good idea when exploring your relative's census record to scroll back and ahead a couple of pages. In this case, I learned that in 1925 there was a number 5 Second Avenue, a number 3 Second Avenue, and a number 1 1/2 Second Avenue.  East Houston was a much narrower street in 1925 than it is now.


By the 1930 U.S. Census, the family was living in Woodbine, New Jersey.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Wordless Wednesday ~ Cousin Israel (in Israel)

Another of the many photographs from my mother-in-law that came from her father's family in Romania and Israel in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. I am sharing them here in hopes of reconnecting with this branch of my husband's family.



The translation of the Yiddish appears to be:
This is my son Israel.
Next month, on 7/16 he is turning 24...and to many long years

Israel is a first cousin of my mother-in-law and the son of her uncle Usher (Morris Goldstein's younger brother). Now I have a birthday for him - July 16 (sometime in the 1940s).

Thank you to those at the Jewish Genealogy Portal Facebook group for assistance in the translation.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Wordless Wednesday ~ Unknown Wedding Couple in Romania or Israel

Another photographs from my mother-in-law that came from her father's family in Romania and Israel in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. I am sharing them here in hopes of reconnecting with this branch of my husband's family.



This one has both Yiddish and Romanian on the back.

The Yiddish is:
This is my daughter Liba with her husband Moishe

The Romanian / Yiddish on the right is:
memento
for my brother
Moriti Goldstein

Moishe Goldstein is my husband's maternal grandfather. So could this woman be a first cousin to my mother-in-law? Unfortunately, I don't know if this was taken in Israel or Romania.

Thank you to volunteers at the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston's "Help Day" in January 2014, as well as volunteers at Jewish Genealogy Portal Facebook page for assistance in the translation.

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Wordless Wednesday ~ Romanian Wedding Couple, June 1947

Another of the many photographs from my mother-in-law that came from her father's family in Romania and Israel in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. I am sharing them here in hopes of reconnecting with this branch of my husband's family.


The photographer's imprint is "Studio FotoSelect Iasi" so I know this is a relative (or possibly very close family friend) on the Goldstein side of the family.



The top is Romanian and is translated:
____ offered with love to my uncle and aunt, by me Paul and [Hilda?]

8 June 1947

The bottom is Yiddish and is upside down in this image. The possibilities include:

This is my sister ____ husband 
Mendele / Menale [?]

This is my ____ with my sister Gendel / Manela [?]

Any other suggestions on the translation are very welcome.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Wordless Wednesday ~ Romanian Wedding Couple 1929

Another of the many photographs from my mother-in-law that came from her father's family in Romania. This one happens to be dated 20/4/1929 (or April 20, 1929, for us Americans). I am sharing them here in hopes of reconnecting with this branch of my husband's family.




For
our dear brother
sister in law and children
Manase Lots (or soți)
Goldstein
20/4/1929

Mister Moritz Goldstein
New York

Moische/Morris Goldstein was my mother-in-law's father. He was living in New York City with his wife, Rose, and two young children. (By the following year, the family had moved to Woodbine, New Jersey.)

Somehow, I doubt that this was mailed to Morris Goldstein in New York in this way, without an envelope. There were dozens of men by the name of Morris Goldstein in New York City in the 1920s...

If anyone has suggestions on the translation, feel free to comment.

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Wordless Wednesday ~ Usher and his Family

Another of the many photographs from my mother-in-law that came from her father's family in Romania and Israel in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. I am sharing them here in hopes of reconnecting with this branch of my husband's family.



1. This is my daughter's husband Mordecai
2. This is my daughter Sheva and her two children
3. My daughter-in-law Dadie [?] with her child Goldie
4. My son Ezriel
         From me and my children
                                              Usher

~~~~~~~~~~~

Usher is a younger brother to Morris Goldstein. These young children are second cousins to my husband.

Thank you to volunteers at the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston's "Help Day" in January 2014, as well as volunteers at Tracing the Tribe Facebook page for assistance in the translation.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Wordless Wednesday ~ Sheva, Mordecai and Tziva

Another of the many photographs from my mother-in-law that came from her father's family in Romania and Israel in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. I am sharing them here in hopes of reconnecting with this branch of my husband's family.



This is my daughter Sheva and her husband
Her husband's name is Mordecai and
their child Tziva
I believe the person who wrote this is my husband's great uncle Usher Goldstein (or Yancu or Yancovitz), brother to Morris Goldstein (1897-1965).

(Siblings Morris, Max, and Anna immigrated to America from Romania; Usher and his brother Shmuel immigrated to Israel.)

Thank you to volunteers at the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston's "Help Day" in January 2014 for assistance in the translation.

November 17 update: And thank you to R. Shoshi Balbirer, member of Tracing the Tribe Facebook page who let me know the original image was upside down! (I have corrected it.)